Grindr hacked, sensitive men’s bits slipped into wrong hands

If you’ve followed dating.org.uk‘s ‘news’ for some time, you’ll know that we’re hot on dating site security. If there’s a new app or extension we learn about, we try to let you know about it as soon as we do.

So when we saw this latest post about a breach of dating site security, we naturally checked it out. However, we were quite surprised when we comprehended the nature and depth of this particular security breach; it wasn’t directly another story of woe about an innocent victim who’d been taken in by a false dating site profile purporting to be a genuine love seeker and given them their life savings.

This breach of security was on a much larger scale and targeted a dating app rather than an online dating site. And we’re not just talking one or two people – according to one recent report, 100,000 users on gay dating site Grindr not only had their dating profile hacked by one unscrupulous individual but also then had the indignity of the identity thief pretend to be them on the dating site.

This is the second such report of dating site hacking on a large scale this year. Grindr is specifically for gay gentlemen who can download the app on their Smartphone and be notified when another subscriber to the service is in the vicinity. A little bit like a booster to their inherent gaydar, if you like.

As well as any financial information the hacker may have had access to, the hacker was able to see all of their tagged ‘favourites’, update, delete and amend details of their dating profile and user photo, chat to other members pretending to be the registered member as well as seeing who’d been sending them what photos and actually impersonate their favourite and hold a conversation with them.

Needless to say, Grindr got to work on their security system as the amount of damaging information that was accessed – well, in the wrong hands personal chats, photos and adventures into the land of promiscuity could be lethal if it belonged to an authoritative figure. A mandatory update was issued, after the Sydney Morning Herald interviewed an anonymous dating site security expert who revealed that Grindr – and its lesbian/heterosexual offshoot Blendr – had hardly any security whatsoever. As such, it was no surprise that such large scale penetration was easy on the gay site. Ooh, err.

The other dating site to recently have had its security breached was Tuff Scruff, a site ran by the fairer sex on Tumblr (has evryone forgotten their e’s?) who like a bit of fluff around their men’s chins. After being hacked, the ladies logged on to find that photos of their facially-haired fancy-men had been switched for women revealing bearded clams, rather than the bearded faces of their dreamboats.

No security system is 100% safe. If you want to keep your dating life online completely separate from the real you, we have some excellent advice coming next from around the world of online security that you can impart on your dating site, or for any other online persona you wish to create.

No gay app yet for women who’d like to Grind

A few applications have tried to provide an equivalent for women to the gay man’s popular mobile dating app Grindr, but none have, as yet, had the meteoric success of the male-only same-sex dating application.

If you’re a gay man, you sign up to Grindr, or so the popular theory goes; the app that lets you know where other potential partners are Grinding in your vicinity, you can check out their dating profile and decide whether you fancy getting together to start dating or, as results would seem to suggest, a casual, intimate affair with no nterest in commitment, other than essential protection.

With almost three million men having downloaded the app across the globe, and a considerable percentage of those here in the UK, if you’re gay you’re almost expected to have the app – but bi and lesbian women are pondering why this type of service is just not working for them as well as the traditional online dating site seems to be.

Others lesbian sites have tried and fell by the wayside

It’s not for the want of trying – there have been a couple of dating applications that have started out as the female equivalent to Grindr.

Qrushr Girls, adopting a similar name, set out to rival the male dating phenomenon but the site, when you try to access it, has a redirect to an insurance site.

Blendr is another dating application that, setting out with the right causes in mind, i.e. targeting straight and lesbian singles, has become off-putting for the female sector it has been aiming to capture by hosting ‘too many penis pics’.

Is it the market for lesbian love that just isn’t there?

There are thousands of bi-sexual and lesbian women hitting the right search terms on the internet, but this hopeful seeking is futile when it comes to finding a reliable app.

In the UK, there are 160k men signed up to Grindr, yet the multitudes of women looking for same sex relations cannot be tempted to sign up for similar services.

What is the different ideology between the dating preferences?

There is a very simple explanation – so simple it not only says something about the state of same-sex dating but also the difference between the mindset of men and women when it comes to hooking up with a firm date.

Men are okay using their dating applications for the use of casual sex, hence these type of dating sites and applications have developed that type of reputation.

Many women prefer a genuine coupling, looking for a more substantial relationship. They, therefore, look to the more traditional dating site and are less likely to use an app to find someone for a one night stand in the local vicinity.

There is a market for lesbian Grindr-type applications but the perceived ideas many women hold of a relationship, even same-sex, indicates that there will never be as much demand as the male-only dating applications, although it is understood that there are hundreds of thousands of bi and lesbian women in the UK, let alone the world.

If there is someone out there with a bit of nounce, this could be an ideal opportunity to plug this hole in the lesbian dating market.